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CBD daily headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • FAO ready to follow up on UN Food System Summit and transform Agri-Food Systems Together
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has entered a new era with a new structure and new dynamics. The 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are approaching; we have to change our agri-food systems urgently and holistically.
  • Rising temperatures reshape when and how much people get outdoors on public lands
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    As summer winds down, millions of Americans are shelving their sandals, draining their kayaks, and dusting off skis in preparation for the recreation season ahead. But seasonal plans for hiking, biking, and skiing will likely shift with the changing climate in years ahead, according to new research from the Institute of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism at Utah State University.
  • How inaction on climate change can worsen the crisis in Afghanistan
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    After decades of foreign intervention and violent conflict, the American mission in Afghanistan has ended and the Taliban have announced a new government. But for millions of Afghans, human-induced climate change has only magnified the strife.
  • Birds with bigger beaks and longer-legged shrews: Animals are evolving to cope with climate change
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Animals are evolving quicker to cope with the warming climate - but where does that leave those that cannot adapt quick enough? A new study, published by Deakin University in Australia, found that birds, in particular, are developing larger beaks, legs and ears to better regulate their body temperatures.
  • How Can Cities Tackle Climate Change & Biodiversity Loss in Nature-Smart Ways?
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Every day, the world awakens to news of another heatwave, flood, drought, tropical cyclone, wildfire, or other climate-induced natural hazard. The new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) gives a code-red climate warning, with a forecast for global warming of 1.5°C by 2040. The global community has grown ever more aware that biodiversity, climate change, economic prosperity, the well-being of people, and the health of the planet are interconnected.
  • Younger generations are the most fatalistic about climate change
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    To better understand differences between generations, including how they perceive one another and the biggest challenges of the day, our team at the Policy Institute at King's College London and New Scientist commissioned a survey of more than 4000 people aged 18 and over in the US and UK. Responses were collected from 2 to 9 August.
  • Russian icebreaker fleet poses as a warning on climate change
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    A massive Russian icebreaker ship clears a path to the North Pole, cutting through the thin ice of the Arctic Ocean. Even in this far-flung region, the impact of climate change can be seen.
  • Climate change is slowly killing Lebanon's famed cedar trees
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    For centuries, Lebanon's famed Cedar tree sat proudly on the mountains of this small Mediterranean state. It has also adorned the centre of the country's red and white flag.
  • Globally, climate change drives a willingness to change lifestyles
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    This year has seen a huge number of climate-related disasters, from hurricanes to drought and from fires to floods. In the middle of the chaos, the IPCC dropped the first installment of its latest climate report, mapping out how our current choices will shape the planet's future. All of this would seem to make now a great time to check in on public views of climate change.
  • Excess rainfall in September result of climate change in Odisha, say experts
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    In the last 3 days, Odisha received 448% more rain than is normal for this time in September, bringing down the deficiency from 29% to 14%. The huge downpour has led to a deluge in several cities including Bhubaneswar, Puri and Cuttack and affected over 2 million people in 20 of the 30 districts
  • Climate Change Means More Subway Floods; How Cities Are Adapting
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Millions of people rely on subways for transportation. But as the world warms, climate-driven flooding in subways is becoming more and more common. NPR correspondents Lauren Sommer and Rebecca Hersher talk about how cities across the world are adapting.
  • Drought puts 2.1 million Kenyans at risk of starvation
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    An estimated 2.1 million Kenyans face starvation due to a drought in half the country, which is affecting harvests. The National Drought Management Authority (NDMA) said people living in 23 counties across the arid north, northeastern and coastal parts of the country will be in "urgent need" of food aid over the next six months, after poor rains between March and May this year.
  • Flash flood submerges southern French villages, fields
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Emergency workers rescued or evacuated hundreds of people in southern France as flash flooding abruptly turned roads and fields into rivers and lakes.
  • A flying great white shark: Chris Fallows' best photograph
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    There is no more iconic species on the planet than the great white shark. Everybody knows what they are, even in the most landlocked countries on Earth, and people are fascinated by them.
  • Show Me the Honey: amateur beekeepers to compete in BBC show
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    It has made The Great British Sewing Bee and spelling bee series Hard Spell but now the BBC is focusing on actual bees - by launching the UK's first competitive beekeeping TV show.
  • Rainbow colours and legs for days': Australian fly species named after drag star RuPaul
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The first insect Bryan Lessard named after a pop culture icon was the Beyoncé fly - Scaptia beyonceae, in 2011. At the time, the CSIRO entomologist caused quite a stir, and was "frowned upon" by some taxonomists.
  • Cake mentioned 10 times more than climate change on TV, study finds
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The word "cake" appeared 10 times more on British television than "climate change" in 2020 while "dog" was mentioned 22 times more, according to new analysis.
  • Latin American and Caribbean forests are key to environmental sustainability and global food security
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The Latin American and Caribbean Forestry Commission highlighted the strategic role of regional forests in improving livelihoods, countering climate change and halting biodiversity loss.
  • Saving America's forests could help curb climate warming
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    America has more than 800 million acres of forest and woods, and most of that land is privately owned. A new study finds that economic incentives for landowners to keep their land in productive forests could be a valuable policy tool for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
  • The cradle of Iraq's ecosystem: Mesopotamian Marshes in desperate need of environmental protection
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    One of Iraq's most enchanting ecological treasures, the Mesopotamian Marshes, is under severe threat from increased environmental degradation, having endured the wrath of Saddam and now the consequences of climate change.
  • Environmental justice: Why civil rights and protecting the planet go hand-in-hand
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    As the global ecological crisis impacts ever-more lives, it is becoming clearer that we cannot talk about cimate change, pollution or biodiversity loss without talking about inequality - whether that's determined by gender, race, class, sexual orientation or disability.
  • Conservationists set out 'nature positive' vision for global biodiversity deal
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Conservationists have called on countries to make the world "nature positive" by 2030 as they hope to shape slow and difficult international negotiations to protect the planet's plants and wildlife.
  • State of the EU 2021: What are the key takeaways from von der Leyen's annual speech?
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The fights against COVID-19 and climate change will be the main priorities for the European Union in the coming year, Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announced on Wednesday during her annual State of the European Union address.
  • Not a single G20 country is in line with the Paris Agreement on climate, analysis shows
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    None of the world's major economies -- including the entire G20 -- have a climate plan that meets their obligations under the 2015 Paris Agreement, according to an analysis published Wednesday, despite scientists' warning that deep cuts to greenhouse gas emissions are needed now.
  • Region of 'Super Corals' Discovered
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    In 2019, a hydrology professor at The University of Texas at Austin set out on a research project to see if he could identify harmful nutrients flowing through groundwater into a delicate coral reef sanctuary in the Philippines.
  • The MPA Guide: A framework to achieve global goals for the ocean
    [released on: 14/09/2021]
    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are now well established globally as tools for conservation, for enhancing marine biodiversity, and for promoting sustainable fisheries.
  • New autonomous method precisely detects endangered whale vocalizations
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The North Atlantic Right Whale (Right whale) is one of the most endangered whale species in the world with only about 368 remaining off the east coast of North America.
  • How plants sense phosphate
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    A new study by the University of Bonn and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) in Gatersleben sheds light on the mechanism used by plants to monitor how much of the nutrient phosphate is available, and to decide when strategies to mobilize and take up more phosphate from the soil must be activated.
  • Centre of Biodiversity Research opens in Leipzig
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Today, the Minister-Presidents of Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia inaugurated the Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research - iDiv) in Leipzig. The centre began operating in 2020 and since then 300 researchers have started working in the new state-of-the-art laboratories.
  • Life-sized camel carvings in Northern Arabia date to the Neolithic period
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The monumental reliefs at the Camel Site in northern Arabia are unique: three rock spurs are decorated with naturalistic, life-sized carvings of camels and equids. In total, 21 reliefs have been identified.
  • New climate migration modelling puts a human face on climate impacts
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    New climate migration modeling work projects increased numbers of people moving within their countries in the developing world-as many as 216 million internal migrants by 2050. The modeling completes work for the World Bank that was released in 2018 as volume 1 of Groundswell.
  • A warm Indian Ocean drives anomalous weather events in East Asia
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    An unusually warm winter in 2019/20 in central China and Japan was followed by a summer that saw record-breaking rainfall in the region, triggering severe flooding and landslides.
  • Research initiative to build framework for climate-smart sustainable agricultural soil management
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Healthy soil is something most of us take for granted, but it is crucial for life. As one of our most vital resources, we depend upon it for the food we eat, the textiles we wear and the wood we use to build our homes.
  • Are there DBPs in that cup of tea?
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Surpassed only by water, tea is the second most consumed beverage worldwide. When boiled tap water is used to brew tea, residual chlorine in the water can react with tea compounds to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology measured 60 DBPs in three types of tea, unexpectedly finding lower levels in brewed tea than in tap water. However, they also detected many unknown DBPs with uncertain health effects.
  • Ancient spider mom preserved in amber found to be protecting her young
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    A trio of researchers with Capital Normal University in China has found evidence of a mother spider protecting her young in an amber sample dated back to 99 million years ago. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Xiangbo Guo, Paul Selden and Dong Rend describe where the sample was found and what they learned about the spider it contains.
  • A novel fly species discovered in Finland
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the Zoological Museum of the University of Turku have published in the journal ZooKeys an official description for Scenopinus jerei, a new fly species from Finland.
  • Scientists are hanging rhinos upside-down from helicopters: Here's why
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Each year, a selection of apparently weird and pointless scientific experiments receive the Ig Nobel Prize. Awarded by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research, the prize honors projects that "first make people laugh, and then make them think."
  • Copying the small structures of Salvinia leaves
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Several plants and animals have evolved surfaces with long-term (i.e., days to months) air-retainability to prevent wetting and submersion. One example is Salvinia, a plant floating on water. The secret "how do they maintain an air-mattress" has been unraveled by researchers.
  • Foraging habits and tactics, diet and activity levels reveal how two octopus species coexist
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    There are more than 300 species of octopus living in diverse habitats that span coral reefs, seagrass beds, sand plains and polar ice regions where they feed on lower trophic levels. Most famous for having eight arms (octopus comes from the Greek, octópus, which means "eight foot"), the behavioral ecology of these mysterious sea creatures, especially octopuses that share habitats, is important for understanding the role they play in community structure and biodiversity of an ecosystem.
  • Bandicoot species 'back from the brink' on Australian mainland
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    A small nocturnal marsupial that once roamed the Australian mainland has been brought back from the brink of extinction after a decades-long conservation effort, authorities said Wednesday.
  • Primate mothers may carry infants after death as a way of grieving, study finds
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Some primate species may express grief over the death of their infant by carrying the corpse with them, sometimes for months, according to a new UCL-led study-with implications for our understanding of how non-human animals experience emotion.
  • Roads have far-reaching impact on chimpanzees
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    Roads have a negative impact on chimpanzee populations that can extend for more than 17 km, new research shows. A team led by the University of Exeter examined the impact of major and minor roads on wild western chimpanzee numbers in the eight African countries in which they live.
  • 18 of 20 gorillas at Atlanta's zoo have contracted COVID
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    At least 18 of the 20 gorillas at Atlanta's zoo have now tested positive for COVID-19, an outbreak that began just days before the zoo had hoped to obtain a veterinary vaccine for the primates, officials said Tuesday.
  • Nigeria: Buhari to Address UN General Assembly Sept 24
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    President Muhammadu Buhari will address the 76rd Session of the high-level General Debate of the United Nations General Assembly at the UN headquarters in New York on Tuesday, September 24, the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) has reported.
  • 76th UNGA session opens, president calls on member states to embrace hope
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) on Tuesday opened its 76th session, with the UNGA president and the UN chief imploring member states to embrace hope and strengthen unity after a challenging year of climate disasters, conflict, and COVID-19.
  • Wish I had magic wand to complete UNSC reform: President of 76th UNGA session Shahid
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    United Nations: President of the 76th session of the UN General Assembly Abdulla Shahid has said he wished he had a magic wand to complete the Security Council reform and expressed hope that the UN members will take this process seriously as he began his presidency of hope of the 193-nation body.
  • Dendias to Visit New York for 76th UN General Assembly General Debate
    [released on: 15/09/2021]
    ATHENS -- Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias will visit New York on Monday, September 20, for the High Level General Debate of the 76th UN General Assembly, foreign ministry spokesperson Alexandros Papaioannou announced on Wednesday.